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  • 10 key considerations for rolling out Windows 10

    Posted on October 10th, 2017 at 09:33 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    These are the top problems I think Chief Info Officers need to address, before jumping to Win10.

    CIO column.

    Any other problems to report, for those running at 30,000 feet?

    If that helped, take a second to support AskWoody on Patreon

    Home Forums 10 key considerations for rolling out Windows 10

    This topic contains 20 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by  anonymous 1 week, 3 days ago.

    • Author
      Posts
    • #136321 Reply

      woody
      Da Boss

      These are the top problems I think Chief Info Officers need to address, before jumping to Win10. CIO column. Any other problems to report, for those r
      [See the full post at: 10 key considerations for rolling out Windows 10]

    • #136356 Reply

      lurks about
      AskWoody Lounger

      The rapid update cycle will probably cause more problems for businesses than MS is expecting. Many businesses need to run some elderly applications that may not run on a later 10 release.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #136376 Reply

      jescott418
      AskWoody Lounger

      I agree, the upgrade cycle will keep everyone evaluating constantly. Yes, Win 10 is probably more secure, but I’ve heard this argument before. Two years into Windows 10 and we are just now seeing a good Windows 10 and more stable upgrade releases. Edge to me is still a work in progress and compatibility issues still happen. Obviously I don’t see too many jumping ship with Windows and yet options are out there to possible move some off of a Windows platform. Time will tell how this progresses.

    • #136401 Reply

      Rock
      AskWoody Lounger

      Maybe the best thing to do is to wait until October 2020. This is when mainstream support for Windows 10 ends. I am interpreting that to being that Microsoft stops adding “features” and will only add in security updates until 2025 (end of extended support).

      If they stop adding in “features” in 2020 then they will probably stop the 6 month update cycle, making Windows 10 a stable environment to compute with.

      If they stop the 6 month update cycle (assuming they will because they are moving onto something else), then maybe Windows 10 will finally be out of Beta lol.

      Anyone have any thoughts on this?

       

      Rock

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #136437 Reply

        FakeNinja
        AskWoody Lounger

        This is something that confuses me, considering Microsoft’s statement about Windows 10 being the “last version of Windows”. If Windows 10 is the last version of Windows then why does the EOL date exist?

        1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #136444 Reply

        MrBrian
        AskWoody MVP

        From When will Microsoft end support for your version of Windows or Office?:

        “The 10-year upgrade cycle for Windows 10 matters most to customers running the Long Term Servicing Branch (LTSB) in enterprise deployments. The 2015 LTSB release shares the support dates shown here. For the 2016 LTSB release, the support dates are pushed out by a year, to October 12, 2021, and October 13, 2026, respectively.”

    • #136431 Reply

      anonymous

      Great article. But you mention UWP apps without explanation or even defining the acronym.

      Are Chief Information Officers learning about Windows 10 familiar with that term/concept?

      • #136438 Reply

        PKCano
        AskWoody MVP

        Great article. But you mention UWP apps without explanation or even defining the acronym.

        UWP apps = Universal Windows Platform apps (the tile apps).

        Are Chief Information Officers learning about Windows 10 familiar with that term/concept?

        They certainly should be familiar with them. That’s about all Win10 has!

    • #136459 Reply

      BobT
      AskWoody Lounger

      We’re moving to Win10 at my workplace for “licensing” and “security” reasons. Currently testing ALL our bespoke applications & websites (all 100+ of them). Takes a good few months to get done, documented, fix issues and so on.

      We have 2 desktop devs and 2 web devs in our team. Keeping the lights on is enough work, managing this every 6 months? Wheee….

      I can see that actual development work won’t be a thing in future, besides patching issues & testing.

       

      Of course at home after discussing it on here, I’m leaning more towards staying on 7. That forced “treadmill” really doesn’t appeal.. If we could pace it ourselves it would probably be alright but eh.

    • #136505 Reply

      Jan K.
      AskWoody Lounger

      We’re moving to Win10 at my workplace for “licensing” and “security” reasons. Currently testing ALL our bespoke applications & websites (all 100+ of them). Takes a good few months to get done, documented, fix issues and so on. We have 2 desktop devs and 2 web devs in our team. Keeping the lights on is enough work, managing this every 6 months? Wheee….

      Ah! Come on!

      All they have to do, is following these few simple steps and… Voila!

      Piece of cake!

      Some interesting comments in the bottom section, btw.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      • #136518 Reply

        lurks about
        AskWoody Lounger

        I was struck by the many comments who appreciated the post (and it is mind-numbing) who said MS is run by loons if they think a roughly annual Windows update will fly at most large companies and many mid sized ones. They do not have the onsite staff or budget to manage this along with all the other stuff they need to do.

    • #136525 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      First of all, Woody – good article. I think you covered a lot of the big issues.

      My biggest trepidation as a SysAdmin regarding Win10 and its viability within small/med biz is cost; cost to implement, cost to test, cost to manage, cost to maintain. Let’s be honest here – any non-home user (small/med biz at a minimum) is going to need to spin up new environments to keep their enterprise’s sanity with Win10. At a minimum, you need 2 servers, ADDS and WSUS; adding SCCM to that is a very good idea, but not necessarily a requirement (yet). Granted, that’s probably not much involved in cost there, because you’ll already have at least 1 ADDS server, and possibly also a WSUS server.

      The problem is, it’s still what I’d consider “a cost”. Essentially you have to re-write domain policies and procedures to be able to deal with Win10 in your enterprise.

      Furthermore, I think you have to argue with your team, whether or not the costs and growing pains associated with a Win10 6 month update schedule are reasonable for you & your enterprise.

      –As opposed to–

      Switching if/where/when possible to something else, like Linux Mint, dealing with teeth gnashing and confused users for an initial few months – but then all things quiet down.

      There are costs both ways; not just financial.
      SysAdmins and their ilk need to determine which cost they want to take on.

      I know for a lot of less-initiated people out there, the possibility of migrating to a Linux environment (or a Linux-compatible environment) is a scary option. But really, I think MS is doing a very good job of providing more evidence to push people in that direction, and not only that, the user-friendliness and stability of the more popular Linux releases nowadays, are also giving good evidence for users to actually consider those alternatives.

      I’m not saying this is the year of the Linux desktop, or 2020 will be; I just think it’s humorous that MS is pushing so hard to remove options away from SysAdmins and their ilk – and we have 3 years to go still. Imagine where will be in 2020, and where Linux will be. The options and alternatives are already pretty strong, *now*… imagine where we’ll be in 3 more years.

      Decisions might not be as hard then after all.
      JMHO

    • #136584 Reply

      MrJimPhelps
      AskWoody MVP

      “Plan and Prepare” / “Targeted Deploy” / “Broadly Deploy” — “Plan and Prepare” is another way of saying “full-time testing staff”.

      “what you know now about Windows 10 may well become obsolete in the next few months.” In other words, you may well be wasting your money by believing you can operate a business with Windows 10.

      How in the world is a small company going to be able to pay for a full-time testing staff? Just for the privilege of running Windows? Especially when you consider that whatever they learn through testing could very well go out the window every six months, mandating that they start over from scratch.

      I wouldn’t be so foolish as to pay for the privilege of being a Microsoft Beta Test site. I’d much rather invest that money in Linux.

      Microsoft is playing their customer base for fools. At some point, companies will get fed up with the whole thing and abandon Microsoft in large numbers.

      • #136588 Reply

        David F
        AskWoody Lounger

        It’s not only full time testing to worry about. Many firms run on quite old hardware (as do a lot of the Public Sector in the UK) so what happens when MS decides to EOL your hardware by refusing to supply updates.

        It’s already occurred once whatever the excuses

        • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by  David F.
        • #136609 Reply

          MrJimPhelps
          AskWoody MVP

          MS EOL’d my father-in-law’s Windows 7 computer by sneaking Windows 10 onto it without his knowledge or consent. The computer became unusable after that happened.

          I’m anxious to install Linux Mint on his computer to see how it will run. Perhaps one day I’ll have that opportunity, and he’ll then be back in business.

          • #136615 Reply

            David F
            AskWoody Lounger

            It’s well worth a try. I had a very old Pentium M and installed Linux Mint and much to my surprise it ran. Not very well but I was surprised it even started.

            I’m using Linux Mint on the main laptop now with Win7 on the desktop. I’m planning on air gapping the Win7 box when Win7 deprecates and using Linux for day to day stuff.

            Hardest thing with Linux Mint is deciding on what desktop to use 🙂

            1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #136596 Reply

      zero2dash
      AskWoody Lounger

      I wouldn’t be so foolish as to pay for the privilege of being a Microsoft Beta Test site. I’d much rather invest that money in Linux.

      EXACTLY what I’m starting to think, especially when Win10 changes every 6 months and then you’re dealing with aggravated users again. What’s the real incentive here?

      • #136610 Reply

        MrJimPhelps
        AskWoody MVP

        Get moving with Linux Mint, Ubuntu, or some other Linux distro right away. Mint is my personal choice. I am amazed at how rock solid and well supported it is.

        Keep a computer around (perhaps dual boot) with Windows 7 till 2020, just in case you need it.

        You will soon find that Linux has become your “default” OS, and that you hardly ever use Windows. And you will enjoy the peaceful feeling of not having to always be on the alert for bad patches, telemetry, etc.

        2 users thanked author for this post.
    • #136724 Reply

      driftless
      AskWoody Lounger

      Stepping back a bit, I think MS’s mistake with 10 is trying to pretend that the OS still matters. An OS is a platform to run applications, not an end in itself, and it is ridiculous to assume that companies will want to execute constant, labor-intensive testing because MS decided to make the OS a moving target.

      I still say, run the last adult version (8.1) so that you can move off Windows by January 2023.

    • #136781 Reply

      anonymous

      http://www.zdnet.com/article/what-to-expect-from-the-windows-10-fall-creators-update/ lists the new features in Win 10 1709/Fall Creators Update which are typical of the twice-per-year upgrades and are mostly not essential for businesses, who tend to crave stability in their business operations.

      In short, MS can make more profits if businesses are not able to continue to upgrade their Windows OS after every 5 years or more.

    • #136785 Reply

      anonymous

      http://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-may-have-price-increases-in-store-for-windows-10-pro-workstation-win-10-downgrade/ lists the price increases for the coming OEM Win 10 Pro for Workstations Business PCs.

      Since the list price for the OEM license (more than 4 processor cores) is reported to be US$214, the price for the Retail license should be about US$399, ie twice the price for Win 10 Pro Standard (US$199), eg needed by gamers who build their own high-end desktops.

    Please follow the -Lounge Rules- no personal attacks, no swearing, and politics/religion are relegated to the Rants forum.

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